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image: The Stuff of Nightmares

The Stuff of Nightmares

By | August 1, 2012

Researchers working in war-torn countries find hints to the molecular roots of posttraumatic stress disorder.

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image: Medical Mavericks

Medical Mavericks

By | July 1, 2012

ALS patients take their fate into their own hands, self-administering an unapproved chemical and collating their results online.

11 Comments

image: A Can of Worms

A Can of Worms

By | June 1, 2012

Scientists at the American Museum of Natural History use DNA barcoding to show that even sardines infected with nematodes can still be kosher.

2 Comments

image: From Bones to Brains

From Bones to Brains

By | June 1, 2012

With the help of a mother, one researcher uncovered a common link between autism and a devastating bone disease.

2 Comments

image: Bushmeat Roulette

Bushmeat Roulette

By | April 1, 2012

Pathogens lurk in illegal wildlife products confiscated at US airports.

12 Comments

image: T-Bee

T-Bee

By | March 1, 2012

Two researchers are trying to train bees to sniff out tuberculosis.

4 Comments

image: The Joint Collector

The Joint Collector

By | March 1, 2012

Forget stamps: one bioengineer amasses broken artificial joints to learn why they failed and how to build better ones.

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image: Genghis Jon

Genghis Jon

By | February 1, 2012

By helping Mongolians cultivate an understanding of their native insect fauna, scientists hope to protect the country's unique yet fragile ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: Reading Tea Leaves

Reading Tea Leaves

By | February 1, 2012

Cyclic peptides, discovered in an African tea used to speed labor and delivery, may hold potential as drug-stabilizing scaffolds, antibiotics, and anticancer drugs.

3 Comments

image: Science Afield

Science Afield

By | February 1, 2012

Portable wet-lab kits allow even soldiers stationed in war zones to earn college science credits.

9 Comments

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