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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: A Weighty Anomaly

A Weighty Anomaly

By | November 1, 2015

Why do some obese people actually experience health benefits?

3 Comments

image: The Upside

The Upside

By | September 1, 2015

Researchers explore the benefits of hearing loss and impairment.

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image: Silence of the Lambs

Silence of the Lambs

By | August 1, 2015

A die-off of newborn lambs in Australia leads to the discovery of a new toxin and clues to a devastating liver disease in children.

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image: Beneficial Stats

Beneficial Stats

By | March 1, 2015

Statisticians who normally crunch numbers to forecast trends in the food-service industry turn their attention to bettering treatment of ALS.

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image: Centennial <em>Shigella</em>

Centennial Shigella

By | February 1, 2015

A strain of the dysentery-causing bacterium isolated in 1915 tells the story of a young soldier who died of the disease in the early days of World War I.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

2 Comments

image: Seal Stowaways

Seal Stowaways

By | November 1, 2014

Pathogen traces recovered from Peruvian mummies suggest tuberculosis-causing bacteria rode from Africa to South America in pinnipeds.

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image: The Devil’s Details

The Devil’s Details

By | November 1, 2014

With the iconic Australian marsupial carnivore on the brink of extinction, Tasmanian researchers race to unlock the immunological mysteries of a disease threatening the species.

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