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» disease/medicine and neuroscience

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image: One Fish, Two Fish

One Fish, Two Fish

By | October 1, 2014

Despite a lack of vision, a blind cavefish can count. Sort of.

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image: Filling In the Notes

Filling In the Notes

By | September 1, 2014

Why the brain produces musical hallucinations

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image: Say

Say "Aaaah"

By | August 1, 2014

Scientists aim to remotely monitor Parkinson’s through voice recordings.

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image: Accidental Orgasms

Accidental Orgasms

By | July 1, 2014

Meet the researcher struggling to gain approval for his medical device, which was originally designed to relieve back pain, but turned out to be an orgasm inducer.

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image: The Crowd Takes On the Computer

The Crowd Takes On the Computer

By | May 1, 2014

Gangs of nonexperts are outperforming science’s best efforts at automating biological problem solving.

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image: The Youngest Victims

The Youngest Victims

By | May 1, 2014

Linking single-gene defects to inflammatory bowel disease in young children may help all sufferers of the illness.

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image: Bad Blood

Bad Blood

By | November 1, 2013

A rare bleeding disorder leads scientists to uncover an unusual blood component that might be common to us all.

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image: An Ear for Home

An Ear for Home

By | April 1, 2013

Pigeons may use ultra-low-frequency sounds to navigate—a strategy that could steer them off course in the face of infrasonic disturbances, such as sonic booms.

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image: Speed-Sensitive Denticles

Speed-Sensitive Denticles

By | April 1, 2013

Tooth-like structures on the skin of a South American fish might serve as high-velocity water-flow detectors.

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image: Decoding Dreams

Decoding Dreams

By | January 1, 2013

Researchers learn to predict visual imagery in dreams based on functional MRI scans of brain activity during sleep.

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