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image: TB over Time

TB over Time

By | August 1, 2015

Eighteenth-century DNA sequences yield insights into the history of tuberculosis infections.

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image: Cancer Kismet

Cancer Kismet

By | April 1, 2015

Fate mapping allows researchers to follow cancer progression from its cell type of origin.

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image: Two-Faced RNAs

Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.

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image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

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image: Centennial <em>Shigella</em>

Centennial Shigella

By | February 1, 2015

A strain of the dysentery-causing bacterium isolated in 1915 tells the story of a young soldier who died of the disease in the early days of World War I.

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image: A New Breed

A New Breed

By | December 1, 2014

Genomics and advanced reproductive technologies have turned cattle breeding into a whole new animal.

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image: Uncommonly Rare

Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

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image: The Youngest Victims

The Youngest Victims

By | May 1, 2014

Linking single-gene defects to inflammatory bowel disease in young children may help all sufferers of the illness.

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image: Getting Down to Business

Getting Down to Business

By | April 1, 2014

Is there a genetic component to entrepreneurial success?

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image: Bad Blood

Bad Blood

By | November 1, 2013

A rare bleeding disorder leads scientists to uncover an unusual blood component that might be common to us all.

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Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

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