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image: (Re)Programming Director

(Re)Programming Director

By | October 1, 2012

Unwilling to accept the finality of terminal differentiation, Helen Blau has honed techniques that showcase the flexibility of cells to adopt different identities.

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image: Taking the Long View

Taking the Long View

By | September 1, 2012

In exploring how embryos take shape, John Wallingford has identified a key pathway involved in vertebrate development—and human disease.

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Fly Guy

By | August 1, 2012

For Michael Dickinson, Drosophila are more than winged gene holders—they’re sophisticated systems for translating sensory information into flight instructions.

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image: Sweet Smell of Success

Sweet Smell of Success

By | July 1, 2012

With persistence and pluck, Leslie Vosshall managed to snatch insect odorant receptors from the jaws of experimental defeat.

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image: Burgers and Flies

Burgers and Flies

By | May 1, 2012

Inspired by Darwin, Mohamed Noor has uncovered the molecular dance by which a single species becomes two.

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Truth and Beauty

By | April 1, 2012

With strong foundations in both art and science, Ahna Skop has been able to capture the marvel of—and mechanisms behind—cytokinesis.

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image: Critical Connections

Critical Connections

By | December 1, 2011

Through a series of sustained collaborations, Joshua Sanes has deciphered the molecular synergy that guides synapse formation.

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image: Beyond Expectation

Beyond Expectation

By | September 1, 2011

Philippa “Pippa” Marrack has made some unanticipated discoveries about how the immune system functions in health and disease.

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image: Foresight

Foresight

By | July 1, 2011

Studying the earliest events in visual development, Carla Shatz has learned the importance of looking at one’s data with open eyes—and an open mind.

12 Comments

image: Making the Gradient

Making the Gradient

By | May 25, 2011

Ron Kaback didn’t believe that electrochemical gradients could power the transport of sugars and amino acids across cell membranes—until he proved that they do.

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