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At Harvard University the chemical biologist looks for new metabolic pathways to investigate how gut bacteria interact with one another and their hosts.

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image: Angela Brooks: Splicing Specialist

Angela Brooks: Splicing Specialist

By | April 1, 2017

At the University of California, Santa Cruz, the researcher combs the cancer genome, looking for weaknesses.

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Member, Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Age: 43

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Instructor, Department of Systems Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Age: 38

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image: Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Houston. Age: 35

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image: Matthew Powner: Origin Solver

Matthew Powner: Origin Solver

By | March 1, 2014

Lecturer, Department of Chemistry, University College London. Age: 32

2 Comments

image: Yoav Gilad: Gene Regulator

Yoav Gilad: Gene Regulator

By | October 1, 2013

Professor, Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago. Age: 38

3 Comments

image: Erica Larschan: Hitting Her Targets

Erica Larschan: Hitting Her Targets

By | November 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, & Biochemistry Brown University, Age: 36

1 Comment

image: David Sabatini: Demystifying mTOR

David Sabatini: Demystifying mTOR

By | March 1, 2012

Principal Investigator, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Age: 44

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image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

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