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image: Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

By | June 1, 2017

Fruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.

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image: Long-term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

Long-term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

By | June 1, 2017

In mice, cells in the prefrontal cortex—where memories are maintained long-term—start to encode a fearful experience right from the start.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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Scientists discover transcripts from the same gene that can express both proteins and noncoding RNA.  

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 Zebra finches reared by another species learn to sing their foster parents’ song with rhythms characteristic of their genetic background.

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Zebra finches dial down dopamine signaling when they hear errors in a song performance.

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image: RNA Sequences Don’t Predict In Vivo Transcript Structure

RNA Sequences Don’t Predict In Vivo Transcript Structure

By | January 1, 2017

Eukaryotes prevent secondary RNA structures called G-quadruplexes, commonly observed in vitro, from forming in the cell. 

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image: Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

By | January 1, 2017

Plants grown in dry soil produce offspring that are hardier in drought conditions, and DNA methylation appears responsible. 

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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