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The Literature

» physiology, cancer and neuroscience

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

3 Comments

image: Signaling Resistance

Signaling Resistance

By | April 1, 2015

Activating signaling pathways, rather than individual genes, reveals roles for both growth and dedifferentiation in establishing resistance to cancer treatments.

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image: Toggling Between Life and Death

Toggling Between Life and Death

By | April 1, 2015

In estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, the transcription factor IRF1 tips the balance between cellular suicide and survival through autophagy.

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image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: Straighten Out

Straighten Out

By | January 1, 2015

Forces from bidirectional growth plates mechanically realign broken bones in infant mice.

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image: Tangle Trigger

Tangle Trigger

By | January 1, 2015

An enzyme that cleaves tau protein in acidic cellular conditions may trigger early events in Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Cadherin Connection

Cadherin Connection

By | December 1, 2014

A multitasking plasma membrane protein coordinates cell division and energy metabolism in healthy—and perhaps also cancerous—Drosophila cells.

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image: Mitochondria Munchers

Mitochondria Munchers

By | November 1, 2014

Glial cells consume mitochondria released by neurons in the optic nerve.

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