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» physiology and cell division

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Carry-On Luggage

By | December 1, 2015

Without a vacuole, cell-cycle progression stalls out in yeast cells.

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Fat Saps Muscle

By | November 1, 2015

The accumulation of fat within skeletal muscle, as happens with obesity, diminishes muscle performance.

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The Regenerators

By | September 1, 2015

A molecular signature makes it possible to trace the details of hair cell replacement in the mammalian inner ear.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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Straighten Out

By | January 1, 2015

Forces from bidirectional growth plates mechanically realign broken bones in infant mice.

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Nuclear Pore QA

By | December 1, 2014

A known membrane-remodeling complex earns a newly identified role as a quality-assurance director during the assembly of nuclear pores.

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Avoiding Salt

By | January 1, 2014

In a newly identified tropism, plant roots steer clear of salinity.

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Flexible Cells

By | September 1, 2013

When stretched, lung cells signal to each other by releasing ATP.

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Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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