The Literature

» cell division and bacteria

Most Recent

Mice engineered to overproduce the organelles involved in cell division spontaneously develop malignancies.

1 Comment

Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

0 Comments

image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

0 Comments

image: Carry-On Luggage

Carry-On Luggage

By | December 1, 2015

Without a vacuole, cell-cycle progression stalls out in yeast cells.

0 Comments

image: Negative Thinking

Negative Thinking

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers uncover the first light-controlled negative-ion channels in algae, and they are fast.

0 Comments

image: The Regenerators

The Regenerators

By | September 1, 2015

A molecular signature makes it possible to trace the details of hair cell replacement in the mammalian inner ear.

1 Comment

image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: Nuclear Pore QA

Nuclear Pore QA

By | December 1, 2014

A known membrane-remodeling complex earns a newly identified role as a quality-assurance director during the assembly of nuclear pores.

0 Comments

image: Polymerase Pieces

Polymerase Pieces

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers discover a new subunit of a bacterial RNA polymerase—as well as hints of its potential role in defending against viruses.

0 Comments

image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Authors Peeved by APA’s Article Takedown Pilot
  3. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  4. Was a Drop in CRISPR Firms’ Stock Warranted?
AAAS