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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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image: Not So Noncoding

Not So Noncoding

By | June 1, 2015

An RNA thought to be noncoding in fact encodes a small protein that regulates calcium uptake in muscle.

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image: Silencing Surprise

Silencing Surprise

By | June 1, 2015

A chromatin remodeler in embryonic stem cells clears the DNA for mRNA transcription while stifling the expression of noncoding transcripts.

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image: Looking for Latent HIV

Looking for Latent HIV

By | May 1, 2015

Sequencing HIV integration sites suggests that clonally expanded T-cell populations may not be the main source of latent virus.

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image: The Origins of O

The Origins of O

By | May 1, 2015

A strain of HIV that has afflicted more than 100,000 people emerged from gorillas.

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

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image: Rethinking Telomeres

Rethinking Telomeres

By | March 1, 2015

Not only do telomeres protect the ends of chromosomes, they also modulate gene expression over cells’ lifetimes.

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image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

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image: Nibbled? No Problem

Nibbled? No Problem

By | February 1, 2015

Making extra copies of their genomes allows some plants to better withstand damage.

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image: Tangle Trigger

Tangle Trigger

By | January 1, 2015

An enzyme that cleaves tau protein in acidic cellular conditions may trigger early events in Alzheimer’s disease.

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