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image: Toggling Between Life and Death

Toggling Between Life and Death

By | April 1, 2015

In estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, the transcription factor IRF1 tips the balance between cellular suicide and survival through autophagy.

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image: Cadherin Connection

Cadherin Connection

By | December 1, 2014

A multitasking plasma membrane protein coordinates cell division and energy metabolism in healthy—and perhaps also cancerous—Drosophila cells.

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image: Polymerase Pieces

Polymerase Pieces

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers discover a new subunit of a bacterial RNA polymerase—as well as hints of its potential role in defending against viruses.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Going Long

Going Long

By | April 1, 2014

Researchers discover a tool to trigger an uncommon strategy cancer cells can use to lengthen their telomeres.

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image: Stem Cell Alter Egos

Stem Cell Alter Egos

By | April 1, 2014

Researchers show that cancer stem cells can exist in two distinct and interconvertible states.

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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image: Exosome Tentacles

Exosome Tentacles

By | March 1, 2014

Unlike the usual smooth, spherical shape of exosomes, glioblastoma-derived exosomes appear to have long nanofilaments protruding from their surfaces.

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image: Patchy Plankton

Patchy Plankton

By | December 1, 2013

Turbulence interacts with the stabilizing efforts of motile phytoplankton to create small-scale patches of toxic, bloom-forming organisms.

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image: Bacterial Sacrifice

Bacterial Sacrifice

By | January 1, 2013

Patterns of cell death aid in the formation of beneficial wrinkles during the development of bacterial biofilms.

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