Advertisement
ProteinSimple
ProteinSimple

The Literature

» plant biology and immunology

Most Recent

image: Ginormous Genome

Ginormous Genome

By | May 1, 2012

Researchers find organisms with huge genomes with high mutation rates, overturning a common expectation in evolutionary biology.

8 Comments

image: Tumor Turnabout

Tumor Turnabout

By | May 1, 2012

A cytokine involved in suppressing the immune system may actually activate it to kill cancer cells.

4 Comments

image: Finding Phenotypes

Finding Phenotypes

By | April 1, 2012

Genes shared across species that produce different phenotypes – deafness in humans and directional growth in plants – may reveal new models of disease.

14 Comments

image: Biota Babble

Biota Babble

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

2 Comments

image: Immune Heat

Immune Heat

By | February 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

3 Comments

image: Prion Protectors

Prion Protectors

By | January 1, 2012

Editor’s choice in immunology

3 Comments

image: Breaching the Wall

Breaching the Wall

By | December 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in immunology

0 Comments

image: Light on Leaves

Light on Leaves

By | October 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in Plant Biology

9 Comments

image: Piggyback Pathogen

Piggyback Pathogen

By | September 1, 2011

Editor’s Choice in Immunology

0 Comments

image: Hiding Under a Cap

Hiding Under a Cap

By | August 30, 2011

Editor's Choice in Immunology

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. The Mycobiome
    Features The Mycobiome

    The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

  2. Antibody Alternatives
    Features Antibody Alternatives

    Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

  3. Holding Their Ground
    Features Holding Their Ground

    To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

  4. Circadian Clock and Aging
    Daily News Circadian Clock and Aging

    Whether a critical circadian clock gene is deleted before or after birth impacts the observed aging-related effects in mice.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies