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image: New Immunity

New Immunity

By | June 1, 2015

A scaffolding protein forms the hub of a newly identified immune pathway in plants.

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image: Nibbled? No Problem

Nibbled? No Problem

By | February 1, 2015

Making extra copies of their genomes allows some plants to better withstand damage.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Sexless Hook-Up

Sexless Hook-Up

By | September 1, 2014

Genome fusion at stem graft junctions can generate new plant species.

1 Comment

image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Elusive Receptor ID’d

Elusive Receptor ID’d

By | April 1, 2014

Scientists identify an extracellular ATP receptor in plants.

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image: Avoiding Salt

Avoiding Salt

By | January 1, 2014

In a newly identified tropism, plant roots steer clear of salinity.

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image: Loss of Potential

Loss of Potential

By | June 1, 2013

In the fruit fly, the ability of neural stem cells to make the full repertoire of neurons is regulated by the movement of key genes to the nuclear periphery.

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image: Sick Mold

Sick Mold

By | May 1, 2013

A virus that infects a crop-killing fungus can spread freely, opening the possibility of its use as a fungicide.

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