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image: Elusive Receptor ID’d

Elusive Receptor ID’d

By | April 1, 2014

Scientists identify an extracellular ATP receptor in plants.

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image: Avoiding Salt

Avoiding Salt

By | January 1, 2014

In a newly identified tropism, plant roots steer clear of salinity.

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image: Intracellular Spirals

Intracellular Spirals

By | December 1, 2013

Membrane twists connect stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets.

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image: Sick Mold

Sick Mold

By | May 1, 2013

A virus that infects a crop-killing fungus can spread freely, opening the possibility of its use as a fungicide.

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image: How Plants Feel

How Plants Feel

By | December 1, 2012

A hormone called jasmonate mediates plants' responses to touch and can boost defenses against pests.

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image: Viral Skeleton

Viral Skeleton

By | November 1, 2012

A newly discovered family of tubulins—members of the cytoskeleton—encoded by bacteriophages plays a role in arranging the location of DNA within virus’s bacterial host.

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image: DNA, Contortionist

DNA, Contortionist

By | August 1, 2012

The DNA forms known as G-quadruplexes are finally discovered in human cells.

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image: Ginormous Genome

Ginormous Genome

By | May 1, 2012

Researchers find organisms with huge genomes with high mutation rates, overturning a common expectation in evolutionary biology.

8 Comments

image: Finding Phenotypes

Finding Phenotypes

By | April 1, 2012

Genes shared across species that produce different phenotypes – deafness in humans and directional growth in plants – may reveal new models of disease.

14 Comments

image: Motor Lock

Motor Lock

By | January 1, 2012

Editor’s choice in structural biology

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