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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: A New Role for Marine Archaea

A New Role for Marine Archaea

By | July 1, 2016

Researchers discover acetogenesis in archaea, suggesting an important role for these little-studied organisms in generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: Marine Bacteria Share Carbon Assimilation Duties

Marine Bacteria Share Carbon Assimilation Duties

By | July 1, 2016

Taxonomic differences in bacterioplankton amino acid uptake

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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image: The Origins of O

The Origins of O

By | May 1, 2015

A strain of HIV that has afflicted more than 100,000 people emerged from gorillas.

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

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