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The Literature

» developmental biology and microbiology

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Bacterial Sacrifice

Bacterial Sacrifice

By | January 1, 2013

Patterns of cell death aid in the formation of beneficial wrinkles during the development of bacterial biofilms.

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image: The Plastic Genome

The Plastic Genome

By | December 1, 2012

The poxvirus stockpiles genes when it needs to adapt.

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image: Microbial Awakening

Microbial Awakening

By | November 1, 2012

Successive awakening of soil microbes drives a huge pulse of CO2 following the first rain after a dry summer.

1 Comment

image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Flu Fights Dirty

Flu Fights Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Mimicking a host-cell histone protein offers flu a sneaky tactic to suppress immune response.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

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