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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Fast Worms

Fast Worms

By | January 1, 2013

A microfluidic device scans individual C. elegans for abnormal traits and sorts wild-type animals from mutants.

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image: Neuron Preservers

Neuron Preservers

By | January 1, 2013

Unlike epithelial cells, neurons respond to herpes infection through autophagy, rather than by releasing inflammatory factors.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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image: Sex Matters

Sex Matters

By | October 1, 2012

Researchers reveal a new pathway of synaptic modulation in the hippocampus exclusive to females.

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image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Brain Expression

Brain Expression

By | August 1, 2012

Researchers map the expression patterns of 1,000 genes in the human brain.

4 Comments

image: Brain Mosaic

Brain Mosaic

By | July 1, 2012

Retrotransposons contribute to genetic variability in human brain cells.

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image: SNAREs at the Synapse

SNAREs at the Synapse

By | July 1, 2012

Using tiny lipid discs, scientists resolve contradictory evidence about how many proteins are required for neurotransmitter release.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

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