Critic at Large

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image: Pet Scans

Pet Scans

By , , and | April 1, 2016

Studying tumor development and treatment in dogs and cats, in parallel with research on rodents and humans, could improve the successful translation of new cancer drugs.

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image: Control ALT, Delete Cancer

Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

1 Comment

image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

1 Comment

image: Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

By | April 1, 2014

Nanotechnology-based therapeutics will revolutionize cancer treatment.

2 Comments

image: Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

By | April 1, 2013

Advances in genomics and cancer biology will alter the design of human cancer studies.

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image: Desperately Seeking Radioisotopes

Desperately Seeking Radioisotopes

By | July 1, 2011

New strategies are needed to address the current and future shortages of radioisotopes that threaten medical research and treatment.

21 Comments

image: Imagining a Cure

Imagining a Cure

By | April 11, 2011

For cancer patients, close is not good enough.

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image: At the Tipping Point

At the Tipping Point

By | February 1, 2011

Data standards need to be introduced—now.

0 Comments

image: Garage Innovation

Garage Innovation

By | January 1, 2011

The potential costs of regulating synthetic biology must be counted against putative benefits.

0 Comments

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