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image: Opinion: Improving FDA Evaluations Without Jeopardizing Safety and Efficacy

Opinion: Improving FDA Evaluations Without Jeopardizing Safety and Efficacy

By | February 1, 2017

What can be done to lower development costs and drug prices?

4 Comments

image: Getting Animal Research Right

Getting Animal Research Right

By | March 1, 2016

Regulatory and compliance expectations for animal-based research are demanding, while public and political scrutiny of animal research is rising.

2 Comments

image: DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

By | March 1, 2013

Citizen scientists can inspire innovation and advance science education—and they are proving adept at self-policing.

5 Comments

image: Regulating Amateurs

Regulating Amateurs

By | March 1, 2013

How should the government ensure the safety and responsibility of do-it-yourself biologists?

2 Comments

image: Regulations for Biosimilars

Regulations for Biosimilars

By | June 1, 2012

As biologic drug patents begin to expire, generic versions will hit the market—but how will they be regulated?

2 Comments

image: Desperately Seeking Radioisotopes

Desperately Seeking Radioisotopes

By | July 1, 2011

New strategies are needed to address the current and future shortages of radioisotopes that threaten medical research and treatment.

21 Comments

image: At the Tipping Point

At the Tipping Point

By | February 1, 2011

Data standards need to be introduced—now.

0 Comments

image: Garage Innovation

Garage Innovation

By | January 1, 2011

The potential costs of regulating synthetic biology must be counted against putative benefits.

0 Comments

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    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

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