Critic at Large

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Measuring PD-L1 levels was a great start. Now we need to quantify more protein biomarkers, assess the tumor mutational landscape, and examine immune cell signatures, too.

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image: Opinion: Improving FDA Evaluations Without Jeopardizing Safety and Efficacy

Opinion: Improving FDA Evaluations Without Jeopardizing Safety and Efficacy

By | February 1, 2017

What can be done to lower development costs and drug prices?

4 Comments

image: Pet Scans

Pet Scans

By , , and | April 1, 2016

Studying tumor development and treatment in dogs and cats, in parallel with research on rodents and humans, could improve the successful translation of new cancer drugs.

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image: Getting Animal Research Right

Getting Animal Research Right

By | March 1, 2016

Regulatory and compliance expectations for animal-based research are demanding, while public and political scrutiny of animal research is rising.

2 Comments

image: Control ALT, Delete Cancer

Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

1 Comment

image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

1 Comment

image: Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

By | April 1, 2014

Nanotechnology-based therapeutics will revolutionize cancer treatment.

2 Comments

image: Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

By | April 1, 2013

Advances in genomics and cancer biology will alter the design of human cancer studies.

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image: DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

By | March 1, 2013

Citizen scientists can inspire innovation and advance science education—and they are proving adept at self-policing.

5 Comments

image: Regulating Amateurs

Regulating Amateurs

By | March 1, 2013

How should the government ensure the safety and responsibility of do-it-yourself biologists?

2 Comments

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