Critic at Large

» science publishing, disease/medicine and culture

Most Recent

image: The Global Science Era

The Global Science Era

By | May 1, 2016

As international collaboration becomes increasingly common, researchers must work to limit their own biases and let cultural diversity enhance their work.

2 Comments

image: Scientific Literacy Redefined

Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.

9 Comments

image: Body, Heal Thyself

Body, Heal Thyself

By | September 1, 2015

Reviving a decades-old hypothesis of autoimmunity

8 Comments

image: Hurdles for Hearing Restoration

Hurdles for Hearing Restoration

By | September 1, 2015

Given the diverse cell types and complex structure of the human inner ear, will researchers ever be able to re-create it?

1 Comment

image: Think Before You Fire

Think Before You Fire

By | May 1, 2015

Industry layoffs may save a few dollars, at the cost of losing the collective brainpower of thousands of scientists.

4 Comments

image: Control ALT, Delete Cancer

Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

1 Comment

image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

1 Comment

image: Facing Down Emerging Viruses

Facing Down Emerging Viruses

By | February 1, 2015

A better knowledge of the pathogenesis of emerging zoonotic diseases is crucial if we want to prepare for “the next Ebola.”

0 Comments

image: Science Gone Social

Science Gone Social

By , , , , and | October 1, 2014

Scientists are beginning to embrace social media as a viable means of communicating with public audiences.

0 Comments

image: A Matter of Size

A Matter of Size

By | August 1, 2014

Erroneous characterization of nanomaterials can misinform the study of a new medicine’s safety and efficacy.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham