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Measuring PD-L1 levels was a great start. Now we need to quantify more protein biomarkers, assess the tumor mutational landscape, and examine immune cell signatures, too.

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image: Pet Scans

Pet Scans

By , , and | April 1, 2016

Studying tumor development and treatment in dogs and cats, in parallel with research on rodents and humans, could improve the successful translation of new cancer drugs.

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image: Control ALT, Delete Cancer

Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

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image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

1 Comment

image: Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

By | April 1, 2014

Nanotechnology-based therapeutics will revolutionize cancer treatment.

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image: Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

By | April 1, 2013

Advances in genomics and cancer biology will alter the design of human cancer studies.

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image: Food for Thought

Food for Thought

By | June 1, 2012

Plant research remains grossly underfunded, despite the demand for increased crop production to support a growing population.

6 Comments

image: Hard and Harder

Hard and Harder

By | June 5, 2011

The path to eradicating malaria in Africa involves much more than just a vaccine.

18 Comments

image: Imagining a Cure

Imagining a Cure

By | April 11, 2011

For cancer patients, close is not good enough.

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image: Another Revolution Needed?

Another Revolution Needed?

By | March 1, 2011

Counting the many plagues that threaten research in the Middle East and North Africa region

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