Critic at Large

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image: Control ALT, Delete Cancer

Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

1 Comment

image: Enhanced Enhancers

Enhanced Enhancers

By | November 1, 2014

The recent discovery of super-enhancers may offer new drug targets for a range of diseases.

0 Comments

image: Remaking Nature

Remaking Nature

By | August 1, 2013

Synthetic biologists need to work together with conservationists to understand the environmental consequences of this new technology.

6 Comments

image: Food for Thought

Food for Thought

By | June 1, 2012

Plant research remains grossly underfunded, despite the demand for increased crop production to support a growing population.

6 Comments

image: Avoiding Animal Testing

Avoiding Animal Testing

By | December 1, 2011

Advances in cell-culture technologies are paving the way to the complete elimination of animals from the laboratory.

82 Comments

image: Vive la Différence

Vive la Différence

By | September 1, 2011

Measuring how individual cells differ from each other will enhance the predictive power of biology.

6 Comments

image: Hard and Harder

Hard and Harder

By | June 5, 2011

The path to eradicating malaria in Africa involves much more than just a vaccine.

18 Comments

image: Another Revolution Needed?

Another Revolution Needed?

By | March 1, 2011

Counting the many plagues that threaten research in the Middle East and North Africa region

1 Comment

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