Critic at Large

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image: Opinion: Fixing Science’s Human Bias

Opinion: Fixing Science’s Human Bias

By and | September 1, 2016

It’s time to accelerate the conversation about why the research community is still not diverse.

3 Comments

image: The Global Science Era

The Global Science Era

By | May 1, 2016

As international collaboration becomes increasingly common, researchers must work to limit their own biases and let cultural diversity enhance their work.

2 Comments

image: Overspending on Overhead

Overspending on Overhead

By | February 1, 2015

Federal research dollars are needlessly wasted as scientists spend more and more of their time trying to recoup operational costs.

5 Comments

image: Psychiatry: An SOS Call

Psychiatry: An SOS Call

By | May 1, 2014

Social policies shaped the practice of psychiatry in the past. As the discipline becomes ever more scientific, the effects of social policy on patient well-being must not be ignored.

0 Comments

image: The Great Divide

The Great Divide

By | December 1, 2013

A two-way bridge between science and policy is desperately needed.

2 Comments

image: Remaking Nature

Remaking Nature

By | August 1, 2013

Synthetic biologists need to work together with conservationists to understand the environmental consequences of this new technology.

6 Comments

image: DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

By | March 1, 2013

Citizen scientists can inspire innovation and advance science education—and they are proving adept at self-policing.

5 Comments

image: Regulating Amateurs

Regulating Amateurs

By | March 1, 2013

How should the government ensure the safety and responsibility of do-it-yourself biologists?

2 Comments

image: Medicines for the World

Medicines for the World

By | October 1, 2012

A global R&D treaty could boost innovation and improve the health of the world’s poor—and rich.

0 Comments

image: Science and Democracy

Science and Democracy

By | October 1, 2012

Researchers and conscientious citizens must unite against the partisan rancor in American politics and restore the role of scientific information in policymaking.

1 Comment

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