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Critic at Large

» public health, techniques and funding

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image: Food for Thought

Food for Thought

By | June 1, 2012

Plant research remains grossly underfunded, despite the demand for increased crop production to support a growing population.

6 Comments

image: One Year On

One Year On

By | March 1, 2012

Some thoughts about the ecological fallout from Fukushima

0 Comments

image: An Evolving Science for an Evolving Time

An Evolving Science for an Evolving Time

By | January 1, 2012

Twenty-first century challenges to the public health of all the world’s populations require forward-looking commitments from epidemiologists.

12 Comments

image: Desperately Seeking Radioisotopes

Desperately Seeking Radioisotopes

By | July 1, 2011

New strategies are needed to address the current and future shortages of radioisotopes that threaten medical research and treatment.

21 Comments

image: Hard and Harder

Hard and Harder

By | June 5, 2011

The path to eradicating malaria in Africa involves much more than just a vaccine.

18 Comments

image: Another Revolution Needed?

Another Revolution Needed?

By | March 1, 2011

Counting the many plagues that threaten research in the Middle East and North Africa region

1 Comment

image: At the Tipping Point

At the Tipping Point

By | February 1, 2011

Data standards need to be introduced—now.

0 Comments

image: Garage Innovation

Garage Innovation

By | January 1, 2011

The potential costs of regulating synthetic biology must be counted against putative benefits.

0 Comments

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