Critic at Large

» culture and science policy

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image: Border Buffers

Border Buffers

By | April 1, 2013

Protected areas help to conserve imperiled tropical forests, but many are struggling to sustain their resident species.

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image: DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

By | March 1, 2013

Citizen scientists can inspire innovation and advance science education—and they are proving adept at self-policing.

5 Comments

image: Regulating Amateurs

Regulating Amateurs

By | March 1, 2013

How should the government ensure the safety and responsibility of do-it-yourself biologists?

2 Comments

image: Military Mind Wars

Military Mind Wars

By | November 1, 2012

How neuroscience research can inform military counterintelligence tactics, and the moral responsibilities that accompany such research

5 Comments

image: Medicines for the World

Medicines for the World

By | October 1, 2012

A global R&D treaty could boost innovation and improve the health of the world’s poor—and rich.

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Science and Democracy

By | October 1, 2012

Researchers and conscientious citizens must unite against the partisan rancor in American politics and restore the role of scientific information in policymaking.

1 Comment

image: Bring On the Transparency Index

Bring On the Transparency Index

By | August 1, 2012

Grading journals on how well they share information with readers will help deliver accountability to an industry that often lacks it.

6 Comments

image: Predatory Publishing

Predatory Publishing

By | August 1, 2012

Overzealous open-access advocates are creating an exploitative environment, threatening the credibility of scholarly publishing.

29 Comments

image: All’s Not Fair in Science and Publishing

All’s Not Fair in Science and Publishing

By | July 1, 2012

False credit for scientific discoveries threatens the success and pace of research.

72 Comments

image: Hard and Harder

Hard and Harder

By | June 5, 2011

The path to eradicating malaria in Africa involves much more than just a vaccine.

18 Comments

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    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

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