Critic at Large

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image: On Race and Medicine

On Race and Medicine

By | February 1, 2014

Until health care becomes truly personalized, race and ethnicity will continue to be important clues guiding medical treatments.

2 Comments

image: Elder Pharmacology

Elder Pharmacology

By | January 1, 2014

Studying and treating the chronic diseases associated with aging needs serious revamping.

5 Comments

image: Three-Way Parenthood

Three-Way Parenthood

By , , and | October 1, 2013

Avoiding the transmission of mitochondrial disease takes a trio, but raises a host of logistical issues.

2 Comments

image: Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

By | April 1, 2013

Advances in genomics and cancer biology will alter the design of human cancer studies.

0 Comments

image: DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

By | March 1, 2013

Citizen scientists can inspire innovation and advance science education—and they are proving adept at self-policing.

5 Comments

image: Regulating Amateurs

Regulating Amateurs

By | March 1, 2013

How should the government ensure the safety and responsibility of do-it-yourself biologists?

2 Comments

image: Genomics-Informed Pathology

Genomics-Informed Pathology

By | January 1, 2013

Twenty-first century lab reports will include test results read by a new breed of pathologist.

1 Comment

image: Medicines for the World

Medicines for the World

By | October 1, 2012

A global R&D treaty could boost innovation and improve the health of the world’s poor—and rich.

0 Comments

image: Polypharmacy

Polypharmacy

By | July 1, 2012

Dietary supplements can have serious side effects when mixed with prescription drugs, but not all herb-drug interactions are bad.

14 Comments

image: Regulations for Biosimilars

Regulations for Biosimilars

By | June 1, 2012

As biologic drug patents begin to expire, generic versions will hit the market—but how will they be regulated?

2 Comments

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