Lab Tools

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: How to Build Bioinformatic Pipelines Using Galaxy

How to Build Bioinformatic Pipelines Using Galaxy

By | August 1, 2016

A point-and-click interface alternative to command-line tools that allows researchers to easily create, run, and troubleshoot serial sequence analyses

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image: Messages in the Noise

Messages in the Noise

By | August 1, 2015

After spending more than a decade developing tools to study patterns in gene sequences, bioinformaticians are now working on programs to analyze epigenomics data.

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image: Limber LIMS

Limber LIMS

By | January 1, 2013

Using laboratory information management systems (LIMS) to automate and streamline laboratory tasks: three case studies

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image: A Little Help from My Friends

A Little Help from My Friends

By | July 1, 2012

How to get the most out of your collaboration with bioinformaticians

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image: Move Over, Mother Nature

Move Over, Mother Nature

By | July 1, 2012

Synthetic biologists harness software to design genes and networks.

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image: Antibodies User Survey

Antibodies User Survey

By | May 1, 2012

Findings show researchers value quality over low price

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image: SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

By | May 1, 2012

Using surface plasmon resonance to improve antibody detection and characterization: four case studies

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image: Combing the Cancer Genome

Combing the Cancer Genome

By | March 1, 2012

A guided tour through the main online resources for analyzing cancer genomics data

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image: No Mo’ Slow Flow

No Mo’ Slow Flow

By | January 1, 2012

Tools and tricks for high-throughput flow cytometry

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