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» cancer and flow cytometry

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image: Flow Cytometry On-a-Chip

Flow Cytometry On-a-Chip

By | June 1, 2015

Novel microfluidic devices give researchers new ways to count and sort single cells.

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image: In Custody

In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

1 Comment

image: Sorting Made Simpler

Sorting Made Simpler

By | December 1, 2014

A guide to affordable, compact fluorescence-activated cell sorters

1 Comment

image: Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

By | April 1, 2014

Three approaches for isolating and characterizing rare tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream

2 Comments

image: Hit Parade

Hit Parade

By | December 1, 2012

Cell-based assays are popular for high-throughput screens, where they strike a balance between ease of use and similarity to the human body that researchers aim to treat.

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image: Antibodies User Survey

Antibodies User Survey

By | May 1, 2012

Findings show researchers value quality over low price

1 Comment

image: Eyes on Cancer

Eyes on Cancer

By | April 1, 2012

Techniques for watching tumors do their thing

4 Comments

image: Combing the Cancer Genome

Combing the Cancer Genome

By | March 1, 2012

A guided tour through the main online resources for analyzing cancer genomics data

5 Comments

image: No Mo’ Slow Flow

No Mo’ Slow Flow

By | January 1, 2012

Tools and tricks for high-throughput flow cytometry

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image: Charting the Course

Charting the Course

By | October 1, 2011

Three gene jockeys share their thoughts on past and future tools of the trade.

6 Comments

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