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image: Using Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Cell Types

Using Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Cell Types

By | December 1, 2016

Improvements in instruments and statistical tools allow the capture and analysis of large data sets.

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image: Mass Spec Analysis of Protein Interactions

Mass Spec Analysis of Protein Interactions

By | October 1, 2016

Using the technique to study how RNA, DNA, lipids, and small molecules interact with proteins

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image: Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

By | October 1, 2016

As the importance of genomic copy number variations for health and disease becomes clearer, researchers are creating new ways to detect these changes in the genome.

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image: Screening  with CRISPR

Screening with CRISPR

By | June 1, 2016

Ever-improving CRISPR-based tools are already ripe for large-scale genetic screens.

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image: Pulling It All Together

Pulling It All Together

By | April 1, 2016

Systems-biology approaches offer new strategies for finding hard-to-identify drug targets for cancer.

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image: Cracking the Complex

Cracking the Complex

By | November 1, 2015

Using mass spec to study protein-protein interactions

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image: In Custody

In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

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image: Tailoring Your Proteome View

Tailoring Your Proteome View

By | August 1, 2014

Computational tools can streamline the development of targeted proteomics experiments.  

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image: Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

By | July 1, 2014

A guide to mass spectrometers that can handle the top-down-proteomics challenge

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image: Moving Target

Moving Target

By | June 1, 2014

New mass spectrometry–based techniques are blurring the lines between discovery and targeted proteomics.

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