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image: Remote Mind Control

Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

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image: Into the Limelight

Into the Limelight

By | October 1, 2015

Glial cells were once considered neurons’ supporting actors, but new methods and model organisms are revealing their true importance in brain function.

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image: Eye on the Fly

Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.

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image: Mouse Traps

Mouse Traps

By | November 1, 2014

How to avoid pitfalls in assays of mouse behavior

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image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

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image: Lights, Camera, Action

Lights, Camera, Action

By | January 1, 2014

A guide for doing in vivo microscopy on neurons in the mammalian brain

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image: Synapses on Stage

Synapses on Stage

By | November 1, 2013

Light microscopy techniques that spotlight neural connections in the brain

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image: Scents in a Flash

Scents in a Flash

By | October 1, 2013

The modern technique of optogenetics stimulates the complex act of smelling with a simple flash of light.

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image: Creative Emulsification

Creative Emulsification

By | November 1, 2012

Enhancing data collection from emulsion PCR reactions: three case studies

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image: PCR Usage and Preferences

PCR Usage and Preferences

By | November 1, 2012

Quantitative real-time technology dominates the market today but digital PCR is on the rise.

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