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» PCR, cell culture and cancer

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image: In Custody

In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

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image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

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image: Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

By | April 1, 2014

Three approaches for isolating and characterizing rare tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream

2 Comments

image: Automation on a Budget

Automation on a Budget

By | January 1, 2014

Solutions for partially automating your cell culture set-up

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image: Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

By | December 1, 2013

Pointers for keeping your cell cultures free of mycoplasma contamination

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image: Buying Cell-Culture Products

Buying Cell-Culture Products

By | March 1, 2013

A survey of The Scientist readers reveals who buys cell-growth products from whom, and why.

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image: Set It and Forget It

Set It and Forget It

By | March 1, 2013

A tour of three systems for automating cell culture

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image: Creative Emulsification

Creative Emulsification

By | November 1, 2012

Enhancing data collection from emulsion PCR reactions: three case studies

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image: PCR Usage and Preferences

PCR Usage and Preferences

By | November 1, 2012

Quantitative real-time technology dominates the market today but digital PCR is on the rise.

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image: Enter the Third Dimension

Enter the Third Dimension

By | September 1, 2012

Cell culture goes 3-D with devices that better mimic in vivo conditions.

2 Comments

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