Lab Tools

» microarray and cell culture

Most Recent

image: Designing In Vitro Models of the Blood-Brain Barrier

Designing In Vitro Models of the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | September 1, 2016

Choosing the right model, be it 3-D or 2-D, requires wading through varied cell sources, cell types, and cell culture conditions.

0 Comments

image: Becoming Acculturated

Becoming Acculturated

By | May 1, 2016

Techniques for deep dives into the microbial dark matter

0 Comments

image: Compatible Company

Compatible Company

By | September 1, 2015

A guide to culturing cells with viruses in mind

0 Comments

image: In Custody

In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

1 Comment

image: Automation on a Budget

Automation on a Budget

By | January 1, 2014

Solutions for partially automating your cell culture set-up

0 Comments

image: Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

By | December 1, 2013

Pointers for keeping your cell cultures free of mycoplasma contamination

0 Comments

image: Beauty, Science-Deep

Beauty, Science-Deep

By | September 1, 2013

Cosmetics companies use advanced genomics and in vitro technology to make skin look young and vibrant—you may never view the makeup aisle the same way again.

1 Comment

image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

0 Comments

image: Buying Cell-Culture Products

Buying Cell-Culture Products

By | March 1, 2013

A survey of The Scientist readers reveals who buys cell-growth products from whom, and why.

0 Comments

image: Set It and Forget It

Set It and Forget It

By | March 1, 2013

A tour of three systems for automating cell culture

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Stomach Cells Change Identity to Drive Precancerous State
  4. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
AAAS