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image: Eye on the Fly

Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.

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image: Picturing Infection

Picturing Infection

By | January 1, 2015

Whole-animal, light-based imaging of infected small mammals

4 Comments

image: Cutting the Wire

Cutting the Wire

By | December 1, 2014

Optical techniques for monitoring action potentials

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image: Sorting Made Simpler

Sorting Made Simpler

By | December 1, 2014

A guide to affordable, compact fluorescence-activated cell sorters

1 Comment

image: Mouse Traps

Mouse Traps

By | November 1, 2014

How to avoid pitfalls in assays of mouse behavior

1 Comment

image: Next-Gen Sequencing User Survey

Next-Gen Sequencing User Survey

By | November 1, 2014

Outsourcing is still the rule and data analysis, the bottleneck.

2 Comments

image: White’s the Matter

White’s the Matter

By | November 1, 2014

A basic guide to white matter imaging using diffusion MRI

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image: Capturing Complexes

Capturing Complexes

By | October 1, 2014

Techniques for analyzing RNA-protein interactions

1 Comment

image: Nuclear Cartography

Nuclear Cartography

By | October 1, 2014

Techniques for mapping chromosome conformation

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image: Entry Requirements

Entry Requirements

By | September 1, 2014

Recent developments in cell transfection and molecular delivery technologies

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