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image: Dial It Up, Dial It Down

Dial It Up, Dial It Down

By | March 1, 2016

Newer CRISPR tools for manipulating transcription will help unlock noncoding RNA’s many roles.

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image: Spoiler Alert

Spoiler Alert

By | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

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image: Reveling in the Revealed

Reveling in the Revealed

By | January 1, 2016

A growing toolbox for surveying the activity of entire genomes

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image: Free Flow

Free Flow

By | December 1, 2015

A sampling of free software for flow cytometry data analysis

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image: Remote Mind Control

Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

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image: Decon Recon

Decon Recon

By | October 1, 2015

Published genomes are chock-full of contamination. But as awareness of the problem grows, so do methods to help combat it.

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image: Messages in the Noise

Messages in the Noise

By | August 1, 2015

After spending more than a decade developing tools to study patterns in gene sequences, bioinformaticians are now working on programs to analyze epigenomics data.

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image: Flow Cytometry On-a-Chip

Flow Cytometry On-a-Chip

By | June 1, 2015

Novel microfluidic devices give researchers new ways to count and sort single cells.

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image: In Custody

In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

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image: Sorting Made Simpler

Sorting Made Simpler

By | December 1, 2014

A guide to affordable, compact fluorescence-activated cell sorters

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