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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

 Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: Aristotelian Biology

Aristotelian Biology

By | September 1, 2014

The ancient Greek philosopher was the first scientist.

4 Comments

image: Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

By | August 1, 2014

In praise of weird science at the edge of life

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Brave Genius</em>

Book Excerpt from Brave Genius

By | November 1, 2013

In Chapter 20, “On the Same Path,” author Sean Carroll describes the initial meeting between Nobel Laureates Jacques Monod and Albert Camus.

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image: Chance and Necessity

Chance and Necessity

By | November 1, 2013

War and justice brought together two of the greatest minds of the 20th century, a scientist and a writer.

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In Chapter 8, "The Conspiratorial Move and the Struggle for Evidence-Based Medicine," author Nicoli Natrass explores the Internet's role in the rise of anti-science sentiment.

12 Comments

image: The Specter of Denialism

The Specter of Denialism

By | March 1, 2012

Conspiracy theories surrounding the global HIV/AIDS epidemic have cost thousands of lives. But science is fighting back.

94 Comments

In Chapter 6, "Research and Teaching at the All-Administrative University," author Benjamin Ginsberg describes the perils of pursuing scholarship and teaching in the industrial environment of today's American institutions of higher learning.

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image: Faculty Fallout

Faculty Fallout

By | August 1, 2011

Administrators have taken over US universities, and they’re steering institutions of higher learning away from the goal of serving as beacons of knowledge.

100 Comments

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