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The public may still believe that male-specific traits, such as high testosterone levels, lead to many of the gender inequalities that exist in society, but science tells a different story.

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

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image: Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

By | September 1, 2015

A new approach shows how both honesty and deception are stable features of noisy communication.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Life on the Edge</em>

Book Excerpt from Life on the Edge

By | August 1, 2015

In Chapter 4, “The quantum beat,” authors Johnjoe McFadden and Jim Al-Khalili rethink Newton’s apple from a quantum-biological perspective.

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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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image: Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

By | May 1, 2015

A close cooperation between science, politics, and economics has helped to control one of history’s most destructive epidemics.  

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>p53</em>

Book Excerpt from p53

By | April 1, 2015

In Chapter 12, "Of Mice and Men," author Sue Armstrong recounts the point at which researchers moved from working with p53 in tissue culture to studying the gene in animal models.

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image: Setbacks and Great Leaps

Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>One Plus One Equals One</em>

Book Excerpt from One Plus One Equals One

By | December 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “Green Evolution, Green Revolution,” author John Archibald describes how endosymbiosis helped color the Earth in a verdant hue.

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