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» history, disease/medicine and evolution

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image: Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

By | September 1, 2015

A new approach shows how both honesty and deception are stable features of noisy communication.

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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>One Plus One Equals One</em>

Book Excerpt from One Plus One Equals One

By | December 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “Green Evolution, Green Revolution,” author John Archibald describes how endosymbiosis helped color the Earth in a verdant hue.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Walking Whales</em>

Book Excerpt from The Walking Whales

By | November 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “Fossils and War,” author J.G.M. “Hans” Thewissen describes the difficulties of conducting field research in a conflict zone.

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Unnatural Selection</em>

Book Excerpt from Unnatural Selection

By | October 1, 2014

In chapter 5, “Resurgence: Bedbugs Bite Back,” author Emily Monosson chronicles the rise of the pesky pests in the face of humanity’s best chemical efforts.

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image: Sleep Tight

Sleep Tight

By | October 1, 2014

Bed bugs are but one example of a species whose populations have evolved in response to human behavior.

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image: Aristotelian Biology

Aristotelian Biology

By | September 1, 2014

The ancient Greek philosopher was the first scientist.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Shocked</em>

Book Excerpt from Shocked

By | August 1, 2014

In Chapter 4, “Science fiction, space travel, and the strange science of suspended animation,” author David Casarett describes his brush with adenosine monophosphate and reanimated mice.

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