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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Pathological Altruism</em>

Book Excerpt from Pathological Altruism

By | February 1, 2012

In Chapter 1, editors Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, and Michael McGrath introduce the concept of well-intentioned behaviors that go awry.


image: Killing with Kindness

Killing with Kindness

By | February 1, 2012

Studying the evolution of altruistic behaviors reveals how knee-jerk good intentions can backfire.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>Future Science: Essays From the Cutting Edge</em>

Book Excerpt from Future Science: Essays From the Cutting Edge

By | October 1, 2011

In an essay entitled "Nurture, Nature, and the Stress That is Life," neurobiologists Darlene Francis and Daniela Kaufer envision a future where science moves past the nature vs. nurture debate in considering differences in human behavioral responses to stress.


In Chapter 6, "Research and Teaching at the All-Administrative University," author Benjamin Ginsberg describes the perils of pursuing scholarship and teaching in the industrial environment of today's American institutions of higher learning.


image: Faculty Fallout

Faculty Fallout

By | August 1, 2011

Administrators have taken over US universities, and they’re steering institutions of higher learning away from the goal of serving as beacons of knowledge.


image: A Scar Nobly Got

A Scar Nobly Got

By | July 1, 2011

The story of the US government’s efforts to stamp out smallpox in the early 20th century offers insights into the science and practice of mass vaccination.


image: Book excerpt from <em>Pox: An American History</em>

Book excerpt from Pox: An American History

By | July 1, 2011

In Chapter 5, "The Stable and the Laboratory," author Michael Willrich explores the burgeoning vaccine manufacture industry that ramped up to combat smallpox epidemics in turn-of-the-twentieth-century American cities.


image: Book excerpt from <em>Everyday Practice of Science</em>

Book excerpt from Everyday Practice of Science

By | February 1, 2011

In Chapter 3, “Credibility: Validating Discovery Claims,” author Frederick Grinnell details the difficulty in making discoveries that buck current scientific paradigms.


image: The Evolution of Credibility

The Evolution of Credibility

By | February 1, 2011

The winding path that an interesting result takes to become a bona fide discovery is just one of the topics covered in this new book on the practice of science.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>Looking for a Few Good Males</em>

Book Excerpt from Looking for a Few Good Males

By | January 1, 2011

In Chapter 2, "Progressive Desire," author Erika Lorraine Milam explores sexual selection’s incursion into evolutionary theory.



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    How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

  2. DNA Repair Pioneers Win Nobel
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    Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich, and Aziz Sancar have won this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work elucidating mechanisms of DNA repair.

  3. Antioxidants Facilitate Melanoma Metastasis
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    Two compounds boost the ability of melanoma cells to invade other tissues in mice, providing additional evidence that antioxidants can be beneficial to malignant cells as well as healthy ones.

  4. Antiparasite Drug Developers Win Nobel
    Daily News Antiparasite Drug Developers Win Nobel

    William Campbell, Satoshi Omura, and Youyou Tu have won this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in recognition of their contributions to antiparasitic drug development.

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