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image: Addressing Biomedical Science’s PhD Problem

Addressing Biomedical Science’s PhD Problem

By | January 1, 2017

Researchers and institutions seek to bridge the gap between emerging life science professionals and available positions.

9 Comments

image: Follow the Funding

Follow the Funding

By | May 1, 2015

In times of budget belt-tightening at the federal level, life-science researchers can keep their work supported through private sources.  

9 Comments

image: Start It Up

Start It Up

By | April 1, 2013

Young researchers who left the academic path to transform their bright ideas into thriving companies discuss their experiences, and how you can launch your own business.

1 Comment

image: So You Want to Write a Book?

So You Want to Write a Book?

By | October 1, 2012

Advice on authoring a textbook, popular nonfiction, or even a novel

4 Comments

Scientists who pursue advanced degrees are typically smart. They are driven. And they are no doubt passionate about their work. But can they cut it in industry?

1 Comment

image: The Best of Both Worlds

The Best of Both Worlds

By | April 1, 2012

Choosing to work in industry does not preclude a return to academe. But the move back takes some planning and finesse.

3 Comments

Female Frontrunners

By | February 1, 2012

How to successfully surmount the challenges women face in becoming biotech industry leaders

7 Comments

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