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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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image: Science History: The First Transgenic <em>Arabidopsis</em>

Science History: The First Transgenic Arabidopsis

By | October 1, 2016

Tweaks to a transformation protocol in 1986 cemented the little plant's mighty role in plant genetics research.

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image: Picturing Inheritance, 1916

Picturing Inheritance, 1916

By | May 1, 2016

This year marks the centennial of Calvin Bridges’s description of nondisjunction as proof that chromosomes are vehicles for inheritance.

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image: Mendel in the Hot Seat, 1902

Mendel in the Hot Seat, 1902

By | February 1, 2016

Raphael Weldon’s critiques of Mendelian principles were 100 years ahead of his time.

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image: Discovering Archaea, 1977

Discovering Archaea, 1977

By | March 1, 2014

Ribosomal RNA fingerprints reveal the three domains of life.

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image: Lords of the Fly, circa 1910

Lords of the Fly, circa 1910

By | September 1, 2013

In a cramped lab overflowing with fruit flies, Thomas Hunt Morgan and his protégés made the discoveries that laid the foundations of modern genetics.

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image: Flying Frog, 1855

Flying Frog, 1855

By | May 1, 2013

Alfred Russel Wallace, Darwin’s unheralded codiscoverer of the theory of evolution by natural selection, found inspiration in the specimens he collected on his travels.

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"White-Blooded" Icefish, 1927

By | April 1, 2013

A bizarre group of Antarctic fishes lost their red blood cells but survived to tell their evolutionary tale, revealing a fundamental lesson about the birth and death of genes.

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image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

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image: The First Australopithecus, 1925

The First Australopithecus, 1925

By | July 1, 2012

The discovery of the 2.5-million-year-old Taung Child skull marked a turning point in the study of human brain evolution.

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