Foundations

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image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

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image: The World in a Cabinet, 1600s

The World in a Cabinet, 1600s

By | April 1, 2012

A 17th century Danish doctor arranges a museum of natural history oddities in his own home.

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image: The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

By | March 1, 2012

The first electron microscope to peer into an intact cell ushers in the new field of cell biology.

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image: Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

By | February 1, 2012

Anna Atkins, pioneering female photographer, revolutionized scientific illustration using a newly invented photographic technique.

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image: Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s

Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s

By | January 1, 2012

How Nobel Laureate Barbara McClintock nearly gave up genetics for meteorology

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image: The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

By | December 1, 2011

A 19th century geologist and minister investigates a prehistoric cave full of hyena bones in his native England.

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image: <em>The Scientist,</em> Inaugural Issue, 1986

The Scientist, Inaugural Issue, 1986

By | October 1, 2011

Twenty-five years later, the magazine is still hitting many of the same key discussion points of science.

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image: The Human Genome Project, Then and Now

The Human Genome Project, Then and Now

By | October 1, 2011

An early advocate of the sequencing of the human genome reflects on his own predictions from 1986.

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image: Animal Electricity, circa 1781

Animal Electricity, circa 1781

By | September 28, 2011

How an Italian scientist doing Frankenstein-like experiments on dead frogs discovered that the body is powered by electrical impulses.

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image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

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