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image: Poetry and Pictures, circa 1830

Poetry and Pictures, circa 1830

By | November 1, 2012

On the bicentennial of his birth, Edward Lear is celebrated for his whimsical poetry and his stunningly accurate scientific illustrations.

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image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

image: The First Australopithecus, 1925

The First Australopithecus, 1925

By | July 1, 2012

The discovery of the 2.5-million-year-old Taung Child skull marked a turning point in the study of human brain evolution.

2 Comments

image: The World in a Cabinet, 1600s

The World in a Cabinet, 1600s

By | April 1, 2012

A 17th century Danish doctor arranges a museum of natural history oddities in his own home.

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image: Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

By | February 1, 2012

Anna Atkins, pioneering female photographer, revolutionized scientific illustration using a newly invented photographic technique.

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image: The Human Genome Project, Then and Now

The Human Genome Project, Then and Now

By | October 1, 2011

An early advocate of the sequencing of the human genome reflects on his own predictions from 1986.

3 Comments

image: Animal Electricity, circa 1781

Animal Electricity, circa 1781

By | September 28, 2011

How an Italian scientist doing Frankenstein-like experiments on dead frogs discovered that the body is powered by electrical impulses.

3 Comments

image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

21 Comments

image: One-Man NIH, 1887

One-Man NIH, 1887

By | June 4, 2011

As epidemics swept across the United States in the 19th century, the US government recognized the pressing need for a national lab dedicated to the study of infectious disease. 

27 Comments

image: Medical Posters, circa 1920

Medical Posters, circa 1920

By | May 25, 2011

William Helfand began buying medically themed collectibles in the 1950s when he started working for Merck & Co. 

0 Comments

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