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image: <em>Apiarium</em>, 1625

Apiarium, 1625

By | March 1, 2015

Galileo’s improvements to the microscope led to the first published observations using such an instrument.

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image: Scientific Publishing, 1665

Scientific Publishing, 1665

By | February 1, 2015

Henry Oldenburg founded Philosophical Transactions to share scholarly news from the “Ingenious in many considerable parts of the World.”

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image: The Sex Parts of Plants, 1736

The Sex Parts of Plants, 1736

By | January 1, 2015

Carl Linnaeus’s plant classification system was doomed, and he knew it.

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image: A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

By | December 1, 2014

A spring cleaning led to the rediscovery of Theodor Boveri’s microscope slides, presumed lost during World War II.

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image: A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

By | October 1, 2014

William Briggs’s theory of optic nerve architecture was unusual and incorrect, but years later it led to Isaac Newton’s explanation of binocular vision.

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image: Illustrating Alchemy, 18th Century

Illustrating Alchemy, 18th Century

By | September 1, 2014

As the science of chemistry developed, public perceptions of alchemists shifted from respect to ridicule.

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image: Tiger Hunt, 1838–1840

Tiger Hunt, 1838–1840

By | August 1, 2014

Zoologist John Gould undertook a financially risky expedition to document the birds of Australia—and found some unique mammals in a perilous situation.

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image: Imaging Intercourse, 1493

Imaging Intercourse, 1493

By | July 1, 2014

For centuries, scientists have been trying to understand the mechanics of human intercourse. MRI technology made it possible for them to get an inside view.

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image: Wheat Whisperer, circa 1953

Wheat Whisperer, circa 1953

By | June 1, 2014

The Green Revolution of the 20th century began with Norman Borlaug’s development of a short-statured, large-grained wheat.

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image: H.M.’s Brain, 1953–Present

H.M.’s Brain, 1953–Present

By | May 1, 2014

A temporal lobectomy led to profound memory impairment in a man who became the subject of neuroscientists for the rest of his life—and beyond.

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