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image: Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

By | April 1, 2017

New monoclonal antibodies kill both cancer-promoting immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in culture.

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image: Promoting Protein Partnerships

Promoting Protein Partnerships

By | September 1, 2016

Scientists generate new protein-protein interactions at an impressive PACE.

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image: Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers have designed a screen to find unique molecules, called riboswitches, that determine whether transcription will proceed.

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image: Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

By | June 1, 2016

Lacing insect food with microbes encoding double-stranded RNAs can suppress insect gene expression.

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image: Tumor-Shrinking Triple-Helices

Tumor-Shrinking Triple-Helices

By | April 1, 2016

A braided structure and some adhesive hydrogel make therapeutic microRNAs both stable and sticky.

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image: Scanning for SIV’s Sanctuaries

Scanning for SIV’s Sanctuaries

By | May 1, 2015

Whole-body immunoPET scans of SIV-infected macaques reveal where the replicating virus hides.  

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image: Bursting Cancer’s Bubble

Bursting Cancer’s Bubble

By | April 1, 2015

Scientists make oxygen-filled microbubbles designed to increase tumor sensitivity to radiation.

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image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | January 1, 2014

Scientists come up with a better way to watch cells leave blood vessels.

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image: BRET Meets FRET

BRET Meets FRET

By | May 1, 2013

Scientists create biocompatible, self-luminescing nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

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