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» immunology, virology and microfluidics

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image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | January 1, 2014

Scientists come up with a better way to watch cells leave blood vessels.

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image: Narrow Straits

Narrow Straits

By | July 1, 2013

Transfecting molecules into cells is as easy as one, two, squeeze.

1 Comment

image: Mimicking Mussels

Mimicking Mussels

By | April 1, 2013

Scientists develop a gel that mimics mollusc glue to coat the insides of blood vessels.

1 Comment

image: Sticky Lithography

Sticky Lithography

By | March 1, 2013

Scotch tape and a scalpel provide a MacGyver-esque approach to microfabrication.

1 Comment

image: Microchannel Masterpiece

Microchannel Masterpiece

By | December 1, 2012

A precision microfluidic system enables single-cell analysis of growth and division.

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image: Bubble Vision

Bubble Vision

By | May 1, 2012

Turning a liability into an asset, cryo-electron microscopists exploit an artifact to probe protein structure.

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image: Delivering Silence

Delivering Silence

By | March 1, 2012

Using RNA viruses to silence genes could optimize tissue targeting while reducing toxicity.

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image: Switching the Bait

Switching the Bait

By | February 1, 2012

Turning a standard technique into an unbiased screen for diagnostic biomarkers

6 Comments

image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

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