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image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.

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image: Film Stars

Film Stars

By | June 1, 2014

Engineered bacteria can shape electricity-conducting nanowires.

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image: Dead or Alive?

Dead or Alive?

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists create nontoxic pH nanosensors to assess viability of transplanted therapeutic cells.

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image: BRET Meets FRET

BRET Meets FRET

By | May 1, 2013

Scientists create biocompatible, self-luminescing nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

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image: Mimicking Mussels

Mimicking Mussels

By | April 1, 2013

Scientists develop a gel that mimics mollusc glue to coat the insides of blood vessels.

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image: The Inside Scoop

The Inside Scoop

By | September 1, 2012

Probing cells with nanometer-scale electrodes

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image: Dynamic Delivery

Dynamic Delivery

By | July 1, 2012

Microscopic sponges made entirely of RNA enable efficient gene silencing.

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image: Switching the Bait

Switching the Bait

By | February 1, 2012

Turning a standard technique into an unbiased screen for diagnostic biomarkers

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image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

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