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» gene silencing, microfluidics and plant biology

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image: Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA

Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA

By | February 1, 2016

Scientists perform plant-genome modifications on crops without using plasmids.

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image: Single-Cell Suck-and-Spray

Single-Cell Suck-and-Spray

By | December 1, 2015

A nanoscopic needle and a mass spectrometer reveal the contents of individual cells.

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image: Stressing and FRETing

Stressing and FRETing

By | August 1, 2014

Two labs have produced FRET-based systems for real-time analysis of a plant stress hormone.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | January 1, 2014

Scientists come up with a better way to watch cells leave blood vessels.

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image: Narrow Straits

Narrow Straits

By | July 1, 2013

Transfecting molecules into cells is as easy as one, two, squeeze.

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image: Sticky Lithography

Sticky Lithography

By | March 1, 2013

Scotch tape and a scalpel provide a MacGyver-esque approach to microfabrication.

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image: Microchannel Masterpiece

Microchannel Masterpiece

By | December 1, 2012

A precision microfluidic system enables single-cell analysis of growth and division.

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image: Dynamic Delivery

Dynamic Delivery

By | July 1, 2012

Microscopic sponges made entirely of RNA enable efficient gene silencing.

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image: Tracing the Ephemeral

Tracing the Ephemeral

By | June 1, 2012

A novel reporter system can track the ever-changing levels of the plant signal auxin with great precision.

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image: Delivering Silence

Delivering Silence

By | March 1, 2012

Using RNA viruses to silence genes could optimize tissue targeting while reducing toxicity.

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