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image: Tumor-Shrinking Triple-Helices

Tumor-Shrinking Triple-Helices

By | April 1, 2016

A braided structure and some adhesive hydrogel make therapeutic microRNAs both stable and sticky.

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image: Bursting Cancer’s Bubble

Bursting Cancer’s Bubble

By | April 1, 2015

Scientists make oxygen-filled microbubbles designed to increase tumor sensitivity to radiation.

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image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | January 1, 2014

Scientists come up with a better way to watch cells leave blood vessels.

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image: BRET Meets FRET

BRET Meets FRET

By | May 1, 2013

Scientists create biocompatible, self-luminescing nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

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image: Mimicking Mussels

Mimicking Mussels

By | April 1, 2013

Scientists develop a gel that mimics mollusc glue to coat the insides of blood vessels.

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image: Milling Magic

Milling Magic

By | August 1, 2012

Ion beams carve slices in frozen cells, giving biologists an interior view.

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image: Bubble Vision

Bubble Vision

By | May 1, 2012

Turning a liability into an asset, cryo-electron microscopists exploit an artifact to probe protein structure.

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image: A Brighter Beacon

A Brighter Beacon

By | April 1, 2012

A novel liquid laser set-up can detect single nucleotide mutations in a cancer gene.

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image: Delivering Silence

Delivering Silence

By | March 1, 2012

Using RNA viruses to silence genes could optimize tissue targeting while reducing toxicity.

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Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

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